Webb took a new colorful photo of the Ring Nebula / Hubr

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Summarize this content to 100 words The Ring Nebula, or Messier 57, in images taken by the James Webb Space Telescope The James Webb Space Telescope has captured an image of the Ring Nebula, which looks like a glowing green-purple eye, presenting a familiar astronomical object in a completely new light. In addition to their stunning aesthetic value, the images obtained by Webb show the Ring Nebula, also known as Messier 57 (M57) and located about 2,200 light-years from Earth, in minute details that will surprise even those astronomers who are familiar with it .Located in the constellation Lyra, the Ring Nebula is a popular target for space enthusiasts, as its donut-like ring of glowing gas and dust is visible even with small amateur telescopes throughout the summer.”I saw the Ring Nebula for the first time as a child through a small telescope,” Western University astrophysicist and principal contributor to the Webb Ring Nebula Imaging Project Jan Cammy said in a statement. “I would never have thought that one day I would be part of a team that would use the most powerful space telescope ever built to observe this object.”The Ring Nebula is the glowing remains of a long-dead star, a “planetary nebula” astronomical object that, surprisingly, has nothing to do with planets. In its center is a white spot, which is a white dwarf star – what is left of the core of this extinct stellar body.M57, or the Ring Nebula, is of particular interest to astronomers not only because it is close enough to be seen even with amateur telescopes, but also because, from our view in the Solar System, the planetary nebula is tilted so that it can be viewed “from above”. This means that observing the Ring Nebula with space telescopes gives astronomers a chance to see what’s going on inside the planetary nebula and shed light on the life and death of stars.”Webb has given us an unusual view of the Ring Nebula that we have never seen before,” said Mike Barlow, a professor at University College London and one of the project leaders. “The high-resolution images not only show the intricate details of the expanding nebula’s envelope, but also show the inner region around the central white dwarf in exquisite detail.”One of the central stars of the Ring Nebula (Messier 57) in Webb’s field of view. When stars similar in size to the Sun run out of fuel for nuclear fusion, they can no longer resist gravity, ending the balance that has kept the star stable for billions of years.During the destruction of the core, the outer layers of the star, in which nuclear fusion continues, burst outward. First, this causes the star to grow into a red giant, a stage the Sun will pass through in about 5 billion years, when it will swell to the orbit of Mars, engulfing the inner planets, including Earth.This outer shell of matter eventually cools and dissipates, forming various forms, including clouds, expanding bubbles, or ring nebulae such as M57. What form a planetary nebula will take depends on complex physical processes in it, which scientists still do not fully understand.This means that observations of this system give us an idea of ​​what the solar system might look like billions of years from now.”We are watching the final chapters of a star’s life, predicting the Sun’s distant future, so to speak, and Webb’s observations have opened a new window into understanding these awe-inspiring cosmic events,” Barlow explained. “We can use the Ring Nebula as a laboratory to study how planetary nebulae form and evolve.”Close-up of the Ring Nebula (Messier 57) taken by the James Webb Space Telescope Astronomers can also gain information about the chemical processes taking place in planetary nebulae by analyzing the colors emitted by their gas and dust when the stars at their centers shower them with radiation.”The structure of this object is simply incredible, and to think that it was all created by just one dying star,” said Western University astrophysicist Els Peeters. – In addition to the morphological treasury, these observations contain a lot of information about the chemical composition of gas and dust. We even found large carbon molecules in this object, and we don’t have a clear idea of ​​how they got there. Yet”.The material of planetary nebulae similar to M57 is enriched in heavy elements that formed during the life of the dead star that gave birth to them. Eventually, most of this matter falls into vast interstellar clouds of gas and dust. When dense areas of these clouds condense and collapse under the influence of their own gravity, new stars are born that contain the material of their predecessors. Thus, objects like the Ring Nebula can tell about the life and death of stars.

Webb took a new colorful photo of the Ring Nebula / Hubr

The Ring Nebula, or Messier 57, in images taken by the James Webb Space Telescope

The James Webb Space Telescope has captured an image of the Ring Nebula, which looks like a glowing green-purple eye, presenting a familiar astronomical object in a completely new light. In addition to their stunning aesthetic value, the images obtained by Webb show the Ring Nebula, also known as Messier 57 (M57) and located about 2,200 light-years from Earth, in minute details that will surprise even those astronomers who are familiar with it .

Located in the constellation Lyra, the Ring Nebula is a popular target for space enthusiasts, as its donut-like ring of glowing gas and dust is visible even with small amateur telescopes throughout the summer.

“I saw the Ring Nebula for the first time as a child through a small telescope,” Western University astrophysicist and principal contributor to the Webb Ring Nebula Imaging Project Jan Cammy said in a statement. “I would never have thought that one day I would be part of a team that would use the most powerful space telescope ever built to observe this object.”

The Ring Nebula is the glowing remains of a long-dead star, a “planetary nebula” astronomical object that, surprisingly, has nothing to do with planets. In its center is a white spot, which is a white dwarf star – what is left of the core of this extinct stellar body.

M57, or the Ring Nebula, is of particular interest to astronomers not only because it is close enough to be seen even with amateur telescopes, but also because, from our view in the Solar System, the planetary nebula is tilted so that it can be viewed “from above”. This means that observing the Ring Nebula with space telescopes gives astronomers a chance to see what’s going on inside the planetary nebula and shed light on the life and death of stars.

“Webb has given us an unusual view of the Ring Nebula that we have never seen before,” said Mike Barlow, a professor at University College London and one of the project leaders. “The high-resolution images not only show the intricate details of the expanding nebula’s envelope, but also show the inner region around the central white dwarf in exquisite detail.”

One of the central stars of the Ring Nebula (Messier 57) in Webb’s field of view.

When stars similar in size to the Sun run out of fuel for nuclear fusion, they can no longer resist gravity, ending the balance that has kept the star stable for billions of years.

During the destruction of the core, the outer layers of the star, in which nuclear fusion continues, burst outward. First, this causes the star to grow into a red giant, a stage the Sun will pass through in about 5 billion years, when it will swell to the orbit of Mars, engulfing the inner planets, including Earth.

This outer shell of matter eventually cools and dissipates, forming various forms, including clouds, expanding bubbles, or ring nebulae such as M57. What form a planetary nebula will take depends on complex physical processes in it, which scientists still do not fully understand.

This means that observations of this system give us an idea of ​​what the solar system might look like billions of years from now.

“We are watching the final chapters of a star’s life, predicting the Sun’s distant future, so to speak, and Webb’s observations have opened a new window into understanding these awe-inspiring cosmic events,” Barlow explained. “We can use the Ring Nebula as a laboratory to study how planetary nebulae form and evolve.”

Close-up of the Ring Nebula (Messier 57) taken by the James Webb Space Telescope

Astronomers can also gain information about the chemical processes taking place in planetary nebulae by analyzing the colors emitted by their gas and dust when the stars at their centers shower them with radiation.

“The structure of this object is simply incredible, and to think that it was all created by just one dying star,” said Western University astrophysicist Els Peeters. – In addition to the morphological treasury, these observations contain a lot of information about the chemical composition of gas and dust. We even found large carbon molecules in this object, and we don’t have a clear idea of ​​how they got there. Yet”.

The material of planetary nebulae similar to M57 is enriched in heavy elements that formed during the life of the dead star that gave birth to them. Eventually, most of this matter falls into vast interstellar clouds of gas and dust. When dense areas of these clouds condense and collapse under the influence of their own gravity, new stars are born that contain the material of their predecessors. Thus, objects like the Ring Nebula can tell about the life and death of stars.

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