Webb saw a huge question mark in deep space

Short description

Summarize this content to 100 words The James Webb Space Telescope has captured a close-knit pair of actively forming stars known as Herbig-Haro 46/47 in high-resolution near-infrared light. The James Webb Space Telescope continues to find answers to questions about the early days of the universe, but it also reveals new questions.More precisely, question marks. On Wednesday, June 26, the telescope team published an image showing the most detailed view of two young, actively forming stars located 1,470 light-years from Earth in the constellation Sailfish. In the image, the stars, named Herbig-Haro 46/47, are surrounded by a disk of material that has fueled the stars for millions of years.But just below these stars, in the background of the stunning image from deep space, there is an object that resembles a giant cosmic question mark. What exactly the object in the shape of a question mark might be is still unclear, but its color and shape give us some idea about it.”It’s likely a distant galaxy or possibly interacting galaxies,” officials at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore, which manages Webb’s science operations, told Space.com.According to representatives of STScI, the red color of the object in Webb’s image suggests that the object, whatever it may be, is at a considerable distance. Even more interesting is the fact that astronomers may have seen the cosmic question mark for the first time.”Perhaps, we are observing this very object for the first time,” STScI added. – To determine with certainty what it is, additional observations will be needed. The web is showing us many new, distant galaxies – so there’s a lot of new science to come! “.A close-up of the question mark-shaped object in a newly released image of a pair of actively forming stars known as Herbig-Haro 46/47. Matt Kaplan, associate professor of physics at Illinois State University, said that this object could be two merging galaxies. “The two prominent features may very well be the merging galaxies in the background, and the upper part of the question mark is part of a larger galaxy that has undergone tidal deformation,” Kaplan said. – Considering the color of some other background galaxies, this explanation does not seem the worst. Although mergers are chaotic, binaries with curved tails coming off them are very typical.”

Webb saw a huge question mark in deep space

The James Webb Space Telescope has captured a close-knit pair of actively forming stars known as Herbig-Haro 46/47 in high-resolution near-infrared light.

The James Webb Space Telescope continues to find answers to questions about the early days of the universe, but it also reveals new questions.

More precisely, question marks. On Wednesday, June 26, the telescope team published an image showing the most detailed view of two young, actively forming stars located 1,470 light-years from Earth in the constellation Sailfish. In the image, the stars, named Herbig-Haro 46/47, are surrounded by a disk of material that has fueled the stars for millions of years.

But just below these stars, in the background of the stunning image from deep space, there is an object that resembles a giant cosmic question mark. What exactly the object in the shape of a question mark might be is still unclear, but its color and shape give us some idea about it.

“It’s likely a distant galaxy or possibly interacting galaxies,” officials at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore, which manages Webb’s science operations, told Space.com.

According to representatives of STScI, the red color of the object in Webb’s image suggests that the object, whatever it may be, is at a considerable distance. Even more interesting is the fact that astronomers may have seen the cosmic question mark for the first time.

“Perhaps, we are observing this very object for the first time,” STScI added. – To determine with certainty what it is, additional observations will be needed. The web is showing us many new, distant galaxies – so there’s a lot of new science to come! “.

A close-up of the question mark-shaped object in a newly released image of a pair of actively forming stars known as Herbig-Haro 46/47.

Matt Kaplan, associate professor of physics at Illinois State University, said that this object could be two merging galaxies. “The two prominent features may very well be the merging galaxies in the background, and the upper part of the question mark is part of a larger galaxy that has undergone tidal deformation,” Kaplan said. – Considering the color of some other background galaxies, this explanation does not seem the worst. Although mergers are chaotic, binaries with curved tails coming off them are very typical.”

Related posts