The tomb of an unknown Mayan ruler was discovered in Guatemala

The tomb of an unknown Mayan ruler was discovered in Guatemala

In Guatemala found the ancient burial of a Mayan ruler of the 4th century AD. Until now, science did not know his name. This discovery corrects scientific knowledge about the Mayan government system.

This was reported by National Geographic. The mask was found in the tropical area of ​​Chochkitam near the city of Peten in Guatemala. The head of the study is Francisco Estrada-Belli, a professor at the Central American Research Institute of Tulane University. He and his team have been looking for traces of human activity in Chochchitam since 2021.

Much of the remains from the peak of the Mayan civilization were looted. Marauders also dug a tunnel here in the center of the ancient city. But they missed one place. Estrada-Belli and his colleague Bhanni Giron spotted the burial using LIDAR mapping technology – and began excavating.

The burial, according to researchers, belongs to the king of the city. Next to his bones were royal paraphernalia, including a stingray spine (indicating that the deceased was male), a jade mosaic mask with two jade plaques, 13 spondylus shells, three ceramic vessels, and three human bones with figures and characters carved on them – probably war trophies

A Mayan deity is depicted on the jade mask. It was placed on the chest of a king buried at Chochchitam around 350 AD.

University of Alabama scientist Alexander Tokovinin, who specializes in Mayan epigraphy, helped decipher the glyphs. They figured out the name of the ruler – Itzama Kokai Bahlam (“god of the sun / bird / jaguar”). The mask depicts the god of the storm, literally “the first god-wizard of rain.”

Estrada-Belli noted that thanks to the find, somewhat new scientific views on how the Maya lived will be formed.

“This is another nail in the coffin of old interpretations of Maya history,” the researcher emphasized.

Such a burial clearly indicates that a person with elite status and royal power rests here. However, his references in works of art and buildings found nearby support the theory that many local kings were subordinates or even puppets of other, more powerful rulers of Mesoamerican cities. Presumably, the ruler buried here was influenced by such leaders as Tikal and Teotihuacan.

We will remind that archaeologists discovered a well-developed system of cities in the Amazon forests of Ecuador. Previously, it was believed that people never lived here, but the settlements found are very developed and date back to pre-Columbian times.

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