The ESRB has proposed that online games scan players’ faces to estimate their age

Short description

Summarize this content to 100 words The US rating agency ESRB has requested permission from the US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to deploy age verification technology to prevent minors from bypassing parental controls. The regulation will require users to take selfies to access online gaming services.The ESRB filed the application with the FTC along with digital identity firm Yoti and youth digital media company SuperAwesome. The proposed system will use facial age matching technology. Once adopted, this method will not replace other verification methods, but will serve as an additional means.A representative of the ESRB emphasized that the images obtained as a result of the scan will not be saved. Nor can they be used to verify the identity of users. The ESRB does not intend to use face-based age ratings to prevent children from buying games with restrictive ratings, an agency spokesperson promised.He explained that if a user wants to sign up for the new service and is under the age of 13, then they must provide the email address of their parents, who will receive the letter and be able to give their consent for the account to be created.Selfies sent to the system will be converted into a set of numbers and compared with the Yoti database. The tools on offer only accept video, so kids can’t bypass protection by sending a still photo of their parents. The check will take an average of one second.Human rights organizations have criticized facial recognition technology and similar systems because of the tools’ inability to accurately identify women and ethnic minorities as quickly as white users.Yoti and SuperAwesome claim that the presented system has an accuracy of 99.97%. The ESRB calls this type of identification more secure than methods of verifying identity based on driver’s licenses, bank card numbers, and social security numbers.In China, age identification by person has been in effect since 2021. Tencent has announced that it will age gamers to comply with the 2019 law, banning them from playing between 10pm and 8am.

The ESRB has proposed that online games scan players’ faces to estimate their age

The US rating agency ESRB has requested permission from the US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to deploy age verification technology to prevent minors from bypassing parental controls. The regulation will require users to take selfies to access online gaming services.

The ESRB filed the application with the FTC along with digital identity firm Yoti and youth digital media company SuperAwesome. The proposed system will use facial age matching technology. Once adopted, this method will not replace other verification methods, but will serve as an additional means.

A representative of the ESRB emphasized that the images obtained as a result of the scan will not be saved. Nor can they be used to verify the identity of users. The ESRB does not intend to use face-based age ratings to prevent children from buying games with restrictive ratings, an agency spokesperson promised.

He explained that if a user wants to sign up for the new service and is under the age of 13, then they must provide the email address of their parents, who will receive the letter and be able to give their consent for the account to be created.

Selfies sent to the system will be converted into a set of numbers and compared with the Yoti database. The tools on offer only accept video, so kids can’t bypass protection by sending a still photo of their parents. The check will take an average of one second.

Human rights organizations have criticized facial recognition technology and similar systems because of the tools’ inability to accurately identify women and ethnic minorities as quickly as white users.

Yoti and SuperAwesome claim that the presented system has an accuracy of 99.97%. The ESRB calls this type of identification more secure than methods of verifying identity based on driver’s licenses, bank card numbers, and social security numbers.

In China, age identification by person has been in effect since 2021. Tencent has announced that it will age gamers to comply with the 2019 law, banning them from playing between 10pm and 8am.

Related posts