NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory thanked Ingenuity for its work and is preparing the helicopter to copy all the data

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory thanked Ingenuity for its work and is preparing the helicopter to copy all the data

New photo one of the damaged Ingenuity blades.

At the end of January 2024, employees of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) thanked Ingenuity for their work. The project team is preparing the helicopter to copy all data to the rover to preserve the logs and the full Ingenuity legacy.

NASA explained that after flight operations are completed, the Ingenuity team will conduct final tests of the helicopter’s operating systems to obtain the necessary telemetry, as well as upload all images and data from the vehicle to the rover. In the current mode, the helicopter can only shoot with its cameras a small area of ​​the surface below it.

“Perseverance” is trying to get to the place of the last landing of the helicopter, but its cameras cannot yet see the small device among the dunes of Mars.

According to NASA, the Perseverance rover is currently performing its primary science mission and has traveled more than 24.6 km. “Perseverance” is located several hundred meters from “Ingenuity”. The rover has been moving toward the helicopter for the last few sols. The rover will not go inside the sand dune zone, because these wheel obstacles can be fatal. NASA doesn’t want the rover to get stuck in the sand because of the Ingenuity photos, but they’re trying to get Perseverance as close to the helicopter as possible with a safe path in mind.

During 72 missions and almost three years of operation, “Ingenuity” flew a total of 17,030 meters above the surface of Mars and spent 7,694 seconds (more than 128 minutes) in flight mode in the planet’s atmosphere. The device reached a ceiling of 24 meters and developed a maximum speed of 10 m/s. During all the flights, “Ingenuity” took hundreds of color photos and several thousand black-and-white pictures with the help of its cameras.

On January 26, 2024, NASA released more detailed photos of Ingenuity’s damaged blades after the incident during Vertical Flight #72. The helicopter destroyed its unique blades upon landing and is now unable to fly, but remains in communication and transmits data from on-board cameras.

On January 29, NASA released new color photos of Ingenuity’s damaged blades, which show that problems with the device began after mission #71 landed, and flight #72 ended with an accident and rendered the helicopter unusable due to the destruction of its blades.

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