Michael Dehan launched the jet project, in which he rethinks Ansible

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Summarize this content to 100 words Michael DeHaan, creator of Ansible, in his blog on Substack talked about the launch of a new product – Jet Enterprise Performance Orchestrator, abbreviated jet. jet is a new enterprise automation and orchestration platform written in Rust and is preparing to be released under GPLv3 (ed. — GPLv2 is indicated in the newsletter, but GPLv3 is indicated on the project website). According to the author, he likes that Ansible has become so popular, and he appreciates the contribution of Red Hat, which absorbed the project in 2015, but admits: There are things I would do differently (I also see things I would do differently” ).Features of the new system:Written in Rust. Because of this, jet has additional, fully asynchronous modes of operation supported by the Rust + messaging streaming architectures with parallelism configured in different parts of the pipeline to resolve resource conflicts. Binaries are also not subject to the global locking problem inherent in the Python interpreter. Fewer mistakes. This is another advantage of Rust – the compiler checks code quite aggressively thanks to its best-in-class type system. As the author assures, the jet platform itself will also be developed in such a way as to carefully conduct a preliminary assessment of the automation content. This will allow you to avoid surprises at the stage of execution and to eliminate as much as possible the common mistakes that arise due to inattention, etc.Simultaneous support of up to 50-100 thousand systems thanks to the new message bus architecture (the author promises to implement it shortly after the first release).Ability to work with existing Ansible modules thanks to a special language shell and 90-95% compatibility with all existing playbooks. This will allow the first version of jet to be released with a minimum number of custom modules. There are also plans to connect to other configuration management systems or even Terraform.Strict backward compatibility (so far only at the idea level, because only the first version was released).When asked who needs another configuration management system in the Kubernetes-beating world, Michael says that even with the popularity of containers, the market he’s targeting is still billions of dollars. jet uses the YAML dialect, which, according to the project’s official website, is also similar to the Ansible® playbook language, as American English is to British English. One of the principles of platform development is to move more slowly to minimize future language changes. Ideally, users will not need to follow language updates, and the documentation should be treated as a specification. There is a project and a big conceptual mission — to demonstrate a vision of DevOps processes and practices that could be scaled at the level of the entire planet. So far, the project code is not published on GitHub, because it is actively developing and preparing for the release of the first version. on official website project, you can read the first drafts of the documentation, join the mailing list or Discord chat with the developers. Jet will initially support the most popular Linux distributions. In the future, they promise to work on all BSD systems.

Michael Dehan launched the jet project, in which he rethinks Ansible

Michael DeHaan, creator of Ansible, in his blog on Substack talked about the launch of a new product – Jet Enterprise Performance Orchestrator, abbreviated jet.

jet is a new enterprise automation and orchestration platform written in Rust and is preparing to be released under GPLv3 (ed. — GPLv2 is indicated in the newsletter, but GPLv3 is indicated on the project website). According to the author, he likes that Ansible has become so popular, and he appreciates the contribution of Red Hat, which absorbed the project in 2015, but admits: There are things I would do differently (I also see things I would do differently” ).

Features of the new system:

  • Written in Rust. Because of this, jet has additional, fully asynchronous modes of operation supported by the Rust + messaging streaming architectures with parallelism configured in different parts of the pipeline to resolve resource conflicts. Binaries are also not subject to the global locking problem inherent in the Python interpreter.

  • Fewer mistakes. This is another advantage of Rust – the compiler checks code quite aggressively thanks to its best-in-class type system. As the author assures, the jet platform itself will also be developed in such a way as to carefully conduct a preliminary assessment of the automation content. This will allow you to avoid surprises at the stage of execution and to eliminate as much as possible the common mistakes that arise due to inattention, etc.

  • Simultaneous support of up to 50-100 thousand systems thanks to the new message bus architecture (the author promises to implement it shortly after the first release).

  • Ability to work with existing Ansible modules thanks to a special language shell and 90-95% compatibility with all existing playbooks. This will allow the first version of jet to be released with a minimum number of custom modules. There are also plans to connect to other configuration management systems or even Terraform.

  • Strict backward compatibility (so far only at the idea level, because only the first version was released).

When asked who needs another configuration management system in the Kubernetes-beating world, Michael says that even with the popularity of containers, the market he’s targeting is still billions of dollars.

jet uses the YAML dialect, which, according to the project’s official website, is also similar to the Ansible® playbook language, as American English is to British English. One of the principles of platform development is to move more slowly to minimize future language changes. Ideally, users will not need to follow language updates, and the documentation should be treated as a specification.

There is a project and a big conceptual mission — to demonstrate a vision of DevOps processes and practices that could be scaled at the level of the entire planet.

So far, the project code is not published on GitHub, because it is actively developing and preparing for the release of the first version. on official website project, you can read the first drafts of the documentation, join the mailing list or Discord chat with the developers. Jet will initially support the most popular Linux distributions. In the future, they promise to work on all BSD systems.

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