“James Webb” saw new details in the remnants of the youngest supernova “Cassiopeia A”

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The James Webb Space Telescope has studied Cassiopeia A, the youngest-known supernova, which erupted just 340 years ago in the Cassiopeia constellation. Webb’s ultra-sensitive infrared devices allowed the dimensions of the remains of the explosion to be examined in detail, which extend for 10 light years and are 11,000 light years away from Earth. The telescope allowed the structure of the gas and dust after the supernova event to be recreated, and its picture shows curtains of orange and red material created by the radiation of warm dust, whilst a loop of green colour is visible in the inner space of the object.

“James Webb” saw new details in the remnants of the youngest supernova “Cassiopeia A”

The James Webb Space Telescope studied the remnants of the youngest supernova, Cassiopeia A, in the Cassiopeia constellation, which erupted only 340 years ago. The telescope was able to examine in detail the structure of the gas and dust after this event and recreate the history of the star up to the moment of its explosion.

The dimensions of the remnants of “Cassiopeia A” (Cas A) extend for 10 light years and are 11,000 light years away from Earth. Webb’s ultra-sensitive infrared devices made it possible to examine the structure of these remains in detail.

They have previously been studied at ground-based and space-based observatories, including NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory. This data is now combined with “Webb” indicators to reproduce a detailed picture of the event.

For example, on Webb’s photo of Cassiopeia A, curtains of orange and red material, created by the radiation of warm dust, can be seen from above and on the left along the borders of the picture. In these regions, matter ejected by the star collides with the surrounding circumstellar gas and dust. The brightly glowing matter of the star in the form of variegated threads of bright pink color lies a little deeper than the cooling dust and is distinguished by the glow of a mixture of various heavy elements, such as oxygen, argon and neon, among others.

In the inner space of the object, a loop of green color is visible, which stretches from the center to the right edge. The object itself has many bubbles, the nature of which is still unknown.

Analysis of this image will allow us to get closer to understanding the origin of cosmic dust in interstellar space, which is abundant even in young galaxies. It is likely that supernovae are its source.

Previously, the Hubble telescope took a picture of the spiral galaxy UGC 2890, in which a powerful type II supernova explosion occurred in 2009 – SN 2009bw. Currently, this explosion is no longer visible in the picture, but the fresh observations received by Hubble will allow researchers to study the consequences of the event.

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