An engineer made the leading version of Airpods wireless headphones

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An engineer has modified Apple’s AirPods wireless headphones to include a USB-C connector for charging batteries from any power supply, bypassing the need for a charging case. The effort was intended to highlight issues with maintainability of the AirPods, which are not designed to be serviced or repaired and are considered disposable due to the degraded batteries. While the engineer also replaced the Lightning connector with USB-C on AirPods and the iPhone X, iFixit has given Apple’s wireless headphones a score of zero for repairability. The engineer has published the project on GitHub under the Do What The Fuck You Want To Public License.

An engineer made the leading version of Airpods wireless headphones

An engineer made the leading version of Apple Airpods wireless headphones. The enthusiast added a USB-C connector to them for charging batteries from any power supply, not just the standard case.


Hardware prototyping consultant, engineer, and microelectronics enthusiast Ken Pillonel detailed in a video how he added wires and a USB-C connector to a set of AirPods, bypassing the need for a charging case.

iFixit experts gave all versions of AirPods and AirPods Pro a zero out of ten for repairability. These gadgets are not intended for service or repair as access to the internal components is not possible without damaging the device. In fact, the manufacturer made them a disposable product, especially since their batteries eventually degrade and lose capacity.

The enthusiast explained that the project to add wires to AirPods is meant to raise user awareness of these maintainability issues, encouraging consumers to think more about simply buying a pair of wired headphones that don’t require consumables, rather than Apple’s wireless offering.

Previously, Pillonel replaced the Lightning AirPods connector with USB-C, and also made the iPhone X with a fully functional USB-C port instead of Lightning.

An engineer has published on GitHub the most difficult part of the project to develop a flexible PCB and convert the main components of the iPhone X charging port from Lightning to USB-C. He did it under the WTFPL (Do What The Fuck You Want To Public License). The developer explained that nothing in his repository is part of Apple’s intellectual property, and any resemblance to real products or registered trademarks is purely coincidental.

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